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Newington, GA

Newington, GA

Background

WCS met Brian Barrs at the Georgia Rural Water conference in 2011. The city of Newington, GA is in a tight spot. They community currently operates a 2 acre oxidation pond that is unable to meet the new limits given them by the State of Georgia. Additionally the pond is land locked and the community doesn’t have another suitable site to build on. Additionally they are under a consent order and need to find a solution sooner rather than later.

Solution & Results

Newington needed to find a solution that could be implemented on the land they currently own and get them back into compliance with the states more stringent limits. Until they met WCS they had feared the only viable option was an upgrade to a mechanical plant at a cost of multiple millions of dollars. After talking with WCS it was determined that they would first need to run a pilot study in order to gain approval from the state regulators and then move quickly to a full scale installation of the Bio-Shells. The mobile pilot unit previously used in Thomasville AL was delivered to Newington on the 8th of February, 2012 for a six month pilot study. This particular pilot study is going to be a real test of the Bio-Shell capabilities. Because of the limited space available around the lagoon, the pilot unit was installed close to the influent of the pond, and as such will have to deal with high strength BOD, TSS and Ammonia levels during the course of the study. Below are the charts of the Ammonia and TSS data to date. The BOD levels mirror the TSS levels closely. The spike in the effluent Ammonia was a result of an air line being cut and going un-detected for almost a week.

newington_graph1newington_graph2

Customer Feedback

Brian Barrs is very excited about the Bio-Shell technology. His community is very small and can’t afford to take on millions of dollars of debt to build a mechanical plant. The proposed system will solve their problems for less than $300,000.